Coachella’s Target Audience

Music festivals attract those who not only love music but also those who have a sense of adventure. Since Coachella offers camping at its festival, it attracts those who are willing to abandon their daily lives for a weekend or two and indulge themselves in a world of music and art. Unlike Warped Tour, which targets a very specific audience with its genre of music, Coachella targets a very broad audience because of its diversity of musicians on its lineup.

Although Coachella’s grand reputation has already helped boost the California-based music festival to the top of the music festival list in the country, Coachella still makes an effort to market itself towards a set audience. As Jeff Fromm reports in his article, “Marketing at Music Festivals: Playing to the Millennial Crowd”, a majority of the thousands of festival attendees fall within the 18-34 age range. As youths, they have the disposable income, and they are also physically willing to partake in consecutive days of standing on their feet for hours and listening to loud music. Coachella vigorously markets itself towards those in that age range.

The first way Coachella tries to appeal towards those between 18-34 is by booking musicians who are very popular amongst that age range. As a primarily indie-alternative music festival, Coachella books young musicians who often have a fan base comprised of young people.

The second way Coachella makes it apparent that it is marketing to those between 18-34 is by promoting festival fashion through clothing brands that mainly young people wear. For example, this past month, Coachella tweeted about H&M, and how it would be partnering with the young and hip clothing brand. As Sandy Cohen explains in her article, “Coachella’s Young Audience a Marketer’s Paradise”, “Coachella’s casual, summery look provides a sweet spot for fashion brands.” By bringing in clothing brands that appeal to the young crowd, Coachella is also targeting its youthful audience by showing them how popular its own brand is.

In addition to its lineup and its fashion brand, Coachella’s sense of isolation from daily life also targets the ‘wanderlust’ and the sense of adventure that its young audience may have. In his piece, “The Branding of Music Festivals”, Joshua Books analyzes the target audience of each major music festival in America. He reports that Coachella targets “hardcore festivalgoers…willing to travel and shell out a pretty penny to make memories that will last a lifetime.” Coachella’s price of passes range from $399-$783 (Books). Those who are willing to pay that price and travel to California to attend a weekend-long concert with never ending music are considered dedicated. Coachella targets young people in its social media campaign because it wants to advertise its popularity, thus convincing its audience that it is worth spending that much money to attend the music festival.

Coachella uses its social media accounts to promote not just its music, but it also uses its accounts to flaunt its popularity to its target audience. Since fashion brands will often partner with Coachella to promote themselves at the festival, Coachella promotes those brands on its accounts, often holding contests with them with some incentive to enter. By promoting those brands popular amongst young people, Coachella is showing that even the popular brands want to be a part of the Coachella experience. Coachella uses ethos to convince its young audience that since all the ‘cool brands’ are coming to Coachella, they should as well.

Works Cited:

Books, Joshua. “The Branding of Music Festivals.” CBX-Blog. CBX, 26 Aug. 2013. Web. 18 March 2015.

Cohen, Sandy. “Coachella’s Young Audience a Marketer’s Paradise.” Associated Press. Las Vegas Review-Journal, 19 April 2014. Web. 18 March 2015.

Fromm, Jeff. “Marketing at Music Festivals: Playing to the Millennial Crowd.” Millennial Marketing. Futurecast, 21 Jan. 2014. Web. 18 March 2015.

Advertisements
Coachella’s Target Audience

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s